2017 Reviews

2017 Reviews

(T)he production is spell binding.

….A muscular production that captures the audience throughout, from Richard’s opening lines, “Now is the winter of our discontent,” through his downfall on the battlefield, where he desperately cries “A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!

Central to this is a fantastic performance by Christopher Gerson in the title role. As malevolent as Richard is, it is impossible to look away from his obsessive quest for power. In Gerson’s portrayal, his steely resolve, unbounded energy, and the wit of his deceit impress even as we are appalled by his horrific thoughts and deeds….”

-Arty Dorman, Talkin Broadway

“…I challenge anyone to watch it without laughing out loud… It is perhaps one of the funniest plays I’ve ever seen anywhere”

– Winona Post

…a total lark… as giddy and funny and slap-happy refreshing as a child running through a lawn sprinkler on a hot summer day… The humor is low-ball, but always tasteful and with the abundant wit one expects of Shakespeare. While the Bard has done his share of the work, this production, directed by Melissa Rain Anderson, polishes the material to a bright shine. The setting and costumes, the use of music, and the style of performance all underscore the point that we are here for a great time, and nothing more.”

-Arty Dorman, Talkin Broadway

“…Children and adults alike will be blown away…by this fantastical true story, based on an untrue story “

– Winona Post

“Shipwrecked is first and foremost a tour-de-force opportunity for the actor who plays De Rougemont, an opportunity put to superb advantage by Chris Mixon in this production. Mixon narrates the astounding tale of De Rougemont’s life with complete conviction, conveying his own amazement with the unlikely turns his life took. He is tremendously aided by two actors, Michael Fitzpatrick and Maya Jackson, who play all the other roles—a host of characters, with Fitzpatrick especially hilarious as the frisky, face-licking dog Bruno and the aboriginal chief, and Jackson especially memorable as Louise’s mother, his aboriginal bride, and George Newness, The Wide World’s publisher. The acting trio work beautifully together, directed by Rick Barbour with precision as shifts from character to character, and scene to scene, are managed without missing a beat. A scene in which Fitzpatrick is a newsstand vendor hawking copies of The Wide World with Louis’ story to a crowd of customers—each member of that crowd played by Jackson—is a marvel of split-second timing and comic invention.”

-Arty Dorman, Talkin Broadway

…It’s a role tailor-made for Mixon…who somehow keeps up his breathless storytelling, physical acrobatics, and frequent costume changes without ever leaving stage for the full 90 minutes.”

-Tom Weber, Post Bulletin

“… the most powerful piece of theater I have seen in my life….It was one woman, but a show so immense, so powerful, there almost wasn’t room for her inside that nearly bare black-box theater….”

Winona Post

“It is, at times, enthralling, engaging, shocking, tragic, hilarious and profound, and is an important message for us to hear today as talk of war escalates among our politicians and news media.”

– Jim Gurley in the La Crosse Tribune